A Longitudinal Study on Stability and Transitions Among Bullying Roles.

Child Dev 2020 Mar 19;91(2):527-545. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Cambridge University.

Trajectories of stability and change in bullying roles were examined through a longitudinal prospective study of 916 school students followed up biannually from age 11 to 17. Perpetrators and victims had relatively stable trajectories with most of the children remaining in the same role over time or becoming uninvolved. Bully/victim was the most unstable role with frequent transitions to perpetrators or victims. Developmental change in bullying roles was found with a decrease in physical forms over time in bullies and victims but with persistently high perpetration and victimization in bully/victims. These findings open new horizons in research and practice related to bullying and can be useful for its early detection or design of targeted interventions.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.13195DOI Listing
March 2020
14 Reads

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

bullying roles
12
change bullying
8
perpetrators victims
8
uninvolved bully/victim
4
time uninvolved
4
bully/victim unstable
4
open horizons
4
role frequent
4
unstable role
4
horizons practice
4
trajectories children
4
stable trajectories
4
bullying early
4
practice bullying
4
children remaining
4
role time
4
remaining role
4
frequent transitions
4
developmental change
4
victimization bully/victims
4

References

(Supplied by CrossRef)

Alsaker F. D. et al.
2012
Joint development of bullying and victimization in adolescence: Relations to delinquency and self‐harm
Barker E. D. et al.
Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 2008

Eisner M. et al.
2000

Similar Publications