Human tularaemia associated with exposure to domestic dogs-United States, 2006-2016.

Authors:
Amy Schwartz
Amy Schwartz
Maxwell School
Kiersten J Kugeler
Kiersten J Kugeler
Michigan State University
United States
Paul S Mead
Paul S Mead
Washington | United States

Zoonoses Public Health 2019 06 16;66(4):417-421. Epub 2018 Dec 16.

Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado.

Dogs have been implicated in the zoonotic transmission of numerous pathogens. Whereas cats are known to transmit Francisella tularensis to humans via bite and other routes, the role of dogs in facilitating infection is much less understood. We reviewed tularaemia case investigation records collected through national surveillance during 2006-2016 to summarize those with dog involvement, characterize the nature of dog-related exposure and describe associated clinical characteristics. Among 1,814 human tularaemia cases, 735 (41%) supplemental case investigation records were available for review; and of those, 24 (3.3%) were classified as dog-related. Median age of patients was 51 years (range: 1-82); 54% were female. Two thirds (67%) of cases presented with ulceroglandular/glandular tularaemia; pneumonic (13%) and oropharyngeal (13%) illness occurred less frequently. Dog-related exposures were classified as follows: direct contact via bite, scratch or face snuggling/licking (n = 12; 50%); direct contact with dead animals retrieved by domestic dogs (n = 8; 33%); and contact with infected ticks acquired from domestic dogs (n = 4; 17%). Prevention of dog-related tularaemia necessitates enhanced tularaemia awareness and tick avoidance among pet owners, veterinarians, health care providers and the general public.

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Source
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/zph.12552
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/zph.12552DOI Listing
June 2019
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References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention et al.
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2013
Dog‐associated risk factors for human plague
Gould L. H. et al.
Zoonoses Public Health 2008
Oculoglandular tularemia: Transmission from rabbit, through dog and tick to man
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Pediatrics 1965

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