Injury, dysbiosis, and filaggrin deficiency drive skin inflammation through keratinocyte IL-1α release.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2019 Apr 19;143(4):1426-1443.e6. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. Electronic address:

Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with epidermal barrier defects, dysbiosis, and skin injury caused by scratching. In particular, the barrier-defective epidermis in patients with AD with loss-of-function filaggrin mutations has increased IL-1α and IL-1β levels, but the mechanisms by which IL-1α, IL-1β, or both are induced and whether they contribute to the aberrant skin inflammation in patients with AD is unknown.

Objective: We sought to determine the mechanisms through which skin injury, dysbiosis, and increased epidermal IL-1α and IL-1β levels contribute to development of skin inflammation in a mouse model of injury-induced skin inflammation in filaggrin-deficient mice without the matted mutation (ft/ft mice).

Methods: Skin injury of wild-type, ft/ft, and myeloid differentiation primary response gene-88-deficient ft/ft mice was performed, and ensuing skin inflammation was evaluated by using digital photography, histologic analysis, and flow cytometry. IL-1α and IL-1β protein expression was measured by means of ELISA and visualized by using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Composition of the skin microbiome was determined by using 16S rDNA sequencing.

Results: Skin injury of ft/ft mice induced chronic skin inflammation involving dysbiosis-driven intracellular IL-1α release from keratinocytes. IL-1α was necessary and sufficient for skin inflammation in vivo and secreted from keratinocytes by various stimuli in vitro. Topical antibiotics or cohousing of ft/ft mice with unaffected wild-type mice to alter or intermix skin microbiota, respectively, resolved the skin inflammation and restored keratinocyte intracellular IL-1α localization.

Conclusions: Taken together, skin injury, dysbiosis, and filaggrin deficiency triggered keratinocyte intracellular IL-1α release that was sufficient to drive chronic skin inflammation, which has implications for AD pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2018.08.042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424655PMC
April 2019
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