The effects of meal-timing on self-rated hunger and dietary inflammatory potential among a sample of college students.

J Am Coll Health 2019 May-Jun;67(4):328-337. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

b Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Cancer Control and Prevention Program Arnold School of Public Health, and College of Nursing , University of South Carolina , Columbia , South Carolina , USA.

College is an important time for young adults to establish healthy eating habits since students are at risk for gaining weight during the college years. An emerging area of research is examining the effect of meal-timing, which involves the timing of food intake throughout the day, in an effort to improve satiety and bodyweight. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of meal-timing among a sample of college students and to assess what aspects from an intervention could help them to adhere to meal-timing long term. Participants were randomly assigned to either a daytime group (≤30% total kcals after 5 pm) or a nighttime group (≥50% total kcals after 5 pm). After completing the intervention, almost half of participants (49%) reported they could adhere to meal-timing long-term. Having more resources that support meal-timing are needed to help students potentially achieve a healthy weight and prevent chronic diseases.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2018.1481074DOI Listing
June 2020

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