Body Weight Misperception and Its Association with Unhealthy Eating Behaviors among Adolescents in China.

Authors:
Hanyi Yan
Hanyi Yan
School of Health Sciences
Garden Grove | United States
Yingru Wu
Yingru Wu
Iowa State University
United States
Theresa Oniffrey
Theresa Oniffrey
Cerus Consulting
Jason Brinkley
Jason Brinkley
College of Allied Health
Rui Zhang
Rui Zhang
Cancer Hospital of China Medical University
Houston | United States
Xinge Zhang
Xinge Zhang
Nankai University
China
Yueqiao Wang
Yueqiao Wang
Henan University
China
Guoxun Chen
Guoxun Chen
University of Tennessee at Knoxville
United States

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2018 05 8;15(5). Epub 2018 May 8.

Department of Family & Community Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.

This study aims to examine associations between body weight misperception and eating behaviors among Chinese adolescents. Students ( = 2641) from a middle school and a high school in Wuhan, China participated in a cross-sectional study in May 2016. A questionnaire based on the World Health Organization’s Global School-Based Student Health Survey was employed to assess responses. Self-reported data, including weight, height, body weight perception, and eating habits, were collected. Body Mass Index (BMI) for age z-score was calculated from self-reported height and weight using WHO AnthroPlus. We used descriptive, logistic regression analysis and a Kappa test to analyze the data using SPSS. Overall, 56.6% of participants did not correctly categorize their weight status; these were much more likely to be girls. Compared with the correctly-perceived group, those who underestimated their weight tended to report eating late at night, having dinners with family, and checking nutrition labels. In contrast, weight overestimating students were less likely to report eating late at night, having breakfasts with family, having dinners with family, and discussing nutrition topics over meals. Body weight misperception was associated with unhealthy eating behaviors among Chinese adolescents.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050936DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5981975PMC

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May 2018
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References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Media influences on body satisfaction in female students
Tucci et al.
Psicothema 2008

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