Endoscopic Excision of Benign Facial Masses in Children: A Review of Outcomes.

Authors:
Deshka Foster
Deshka Foster
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford | United States
Tiffany J Sinclair
Tiffany J Sinclair
Stanford University School of Medicine
Jordan S Taylor
Jordan S Taylor
Division of Pediatric Surgery
Albany | United States
Sanjeev Dutta
Sanjeev Dutta
Lucile Packard Children's Hospital
Matias Bruzoni
Matias Bruzoni
University of Nebraska Medical Center

J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 2018 May 15;28(5):617-621. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

2 Division of Pediatric Surgery, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University Medical Center , Stanford, California.

Purpose: Benign masses of the eyebrow and forehead are common in pediatric patients and can result in facial asymmetry, discomfort, or super-infection. Excision is classically conducted via an incision directly over the mass, which can produce sub-optimal cosmesis. Recently, an endoscopic approach using pediatric brow-lift equipment has been adopted. We reviewed our center's experience with endoscopic removal of benign facial lesions and compared these cases with an equivalent series of open cases.

Materials And Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify pediatric cases of endoscopic and open removal of benign eyebrow or forehead lesions at our institution from 2009 to 2016. Clinical and cosmetic outcomes were reviewed.

Results: A total of 40 endoscopic and 25 open cases of excision of benign facial lesions in children were identified. For the patients who underwent endoscopic excision, the majority (85%) presented with a cyst located at the eyebrow. Histologic examination revealed 36 dermoid cysts (90%), 2 epidermal cysts, and 2 pilomatrixomas. Of the 36 cases with post-operative follow-up, 32 patients (89%) had an uncomplicated recovery with good cosmesis. Two patients had an eyebrow droop that resolved without intervention. One patient had localized numbness overlying the site, but no motor deficits. One patient presented with a recurrent dermoid cyst that required open resection. For the patients who underwent open excision, the majority (52%) had dermoid cysts located at the eyebrow. Of the 22 cases with follow-up, 20 of the patients had an uncomplicated recovery (90%). Comparing the rate of complications, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 1.0).

Conclusion: Endoscopic excision of benign forehead and eyebrow lesions in pediatric patients is feasible and yields excellent cosmetic results. When compared with open excision, complication rates are similar between both approaches and a facial scar can be avoided with an endoscopic approach.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/lap.2017.0168DOI Listing
May 2018
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