CABG: A continuing evolution.

Authors:
Faisal Bakaeen
Faisal Bakaeen
Baylor College of Medicine
United States

Cleve Clin J Med 2017 Dec;84(12 Suppl 4):e15-e19

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart & Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Use of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has had a resurgence, as clinical trial data emerged showing that it remains the standard of care for patients with complex lesions. Debate exists regarding various factors, including endoscopic vs open vein-graft harvesting, single vs bilateral mammary artery grafts, radial artery vs saphenous vein grafts, right internal mammary artery vs radial artery grafts, and on-pump vs off-pump surgery. More recent developments include minimally invasive approaches, robotics, and hybrid revascularization, which are changing the risk-benefit ratio for this patient population.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3949/ccjm.84.s4.04DOI Listing
December 2017
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