Update on the management of venous thromboembolism.

Authors:
John R Bartholomew
John R Bartholomew
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
United States

Cleve Clin J Med 2017 Dec;84(12 Suppl 3):39-46

Section Head, Department of Vascular Medicine, Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism, is a common cardiovascular disease associated with significant morbidity ranging from painful leg swelling, chest pain, shortness of breath, and even death. Long-term complications include recurrent VTE, postpulmonary embolism syndrome, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Management of VTE requires immediate anticoagulation therapy based on a risk assessment for bleeding. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have become an important option for patients as reflected in the most recent American College of Chest Physician treatment guidelines.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3949/ccjm.84.s3.04DOI Listing
December 2017
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