Physical Examination is the Best Predictor of the Need for Abdominal Surgery in Children Following Motor Vehicle Collision.

J Emerg Med 2018 01 6;54(1):1-7. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Indiana University School of Medicine, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Indianapolis, Indiana; Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University Health, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Indianapolis, Indiana; Department of Surgery, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Background: Exploratory laparotomy in children after motor vehicle collision (MVC) is rare. In the absence of definitive hemorrhage or free abdominal air on radiographic imaging, predictors for operative exploration are conflicting.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore objective findings that may aid in determining which children require operative abdominal exploration after MVC.

Methods: Data from 2010-2014 at an American College of Surgeons-certified level 1 pediatric trauma center were retrospectively reviewed. Demographics, vital signs, laboratory data, radiologic studies, operative records, associated injuries, and outcomes were analyzed and p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: Eight hundred sixty-two patients 0-18 years of age presented to the hospital after an MVC during the study period. Seventeen patients (2.0%) required abdominal exploration and all were found to have intraabdominal injuries. Respiratory rate was the only vital sign that was significantly altered (p = 0.04) in those who required abdominal surgery compared with those who did not. Physical examination findings, such as the seat belt sign, abdominal bruising, abdominal wound, and abdominal tenderness, were present significantly more frequently in those requiring abdominal surgery (p < 0.0001). Each finding had a negative predictive value for the need for operative exploration of at least 0.98. There were no significant differences in trauma laboratory values or radiographic findings between the 2 groups.

Conclusion: Data from this study solidify the relationship between specific physical examination findings and the need for abdominal exploration after MVC in children. In addition, these data suggest that a lack of the seat belt sign, abdominal bruising, abdominal wounds, or abdominal tenderness are individually predictive of patients who will not require surgical intervention.

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Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07364679173071
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2017.08.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5865640PMC
January 2018
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