Insight into the phenotype of infants with Pompe disease identified by newborn screening with the common c.-32-13T>G "late-onset" GAA variant.

Authors:
Laura E Case
Laura E Case
Duke University Medical Center
Lauren A Bailey
Lauren A Bailey
Duke University Medical Center (DUMC)
Zoheb B Kazi
Zoheb B Kazi
Duke University Medical Center
United States
Ankit K Desai
Ankit K Desai
Duke University Medical Center
Kathryn L Berrier
Kathryn L Berrier
Duke University Medical Center
Julie Coats
Julie Coats
Emory University
Daytona Beach | United States

Mol Genet Metab 2017 Nov 19;122(3):99-107. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: Newborn screening (NBS) has led to early diagnosis and early initiation of treatment for infantile onset Pompe Disease (IOPD). However, guidelines for management of late onset Pompe disease (LOPD) via NBS, especially with the IVS c.-32-13T>G are not clear. This IVS variant is noted in 68-90% cases with LOPD and has been presumed to result in "adult" disease in compound heterozygosity, with a few cases with earlier onset and a mild to no phenotype in homozygosity. Our study evaluates newborns with LOPD having IVS variant with a diligent multidisciplinary approach to determine if they have an early presentation.

Methods: Seven children with LOPD identified by NBS with IVS variant (3 compound heterozygous, and 4 homozygous) were evaluated with clinical, biochemical (CK, AST, ALT, and urinary Glc), cardiac evaluation, physical therapy (PT), occupational, and speech/language therapy.

Results: All seven patients demonstrated motor involvement by age 6months; the three patients with c.-32-13 T>G variant in compound heterozygosity had symptoms as neonates. Patients with c.-32-13 T>G variant in compound heterozygosity had more involvement with persistent hyperCKemia, elevated AST and ALT, swallowing difficulties, limb-girdle weakness, delayed motor milestones, and were initiated on ERT. The patients with c.-32-13T>G variant in homozygosity had normal laboratory parameters, and presented with very subtle yet LOPD specific signs, identified only by meticulous assessments.

Conclusion: This patient cohort represents the first carefully phenotyped cohort of infants with LOPD with the "late-onset" GAA variant c.-32-13T>G detected by NBS in the USA. It emphasizes not only the opportunity for early detection of skeletal and other muscle involvement in infants with c.-32-13T>G variant but also a high probability of overlooking or underestimating the significance of clinically present and detectable features. It can thus serve as a valuable contribution in the development of evaluation and treatment algorithms for infants with LOPD.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ymgme.2017.09.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5722675PMC
November 2017
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