New Views into the Genetic Landscape of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

Authors:
Xiaoyu Zhao
Xiaoyu Zhao
Stony Brook University
Stony Brook | United States
Scott Powers
Scott Powers
University of Florida
United States

Cancer Cell 2017 08;32(2):131-133

Department of Pathology, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA. Electronic address:

Whether metastasis-specific genetic alterations exist remains controversial. The study by Yates et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell provides evidence that metastases emerge late during primary breast cancer progression and that additional driver mutations are often acquired, posing both challenges and opportunities for precision treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccell.2017.07.011DOI Listing
August 2017
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