Insight into immunocytes infiltrations in polymorphous light eruption.

Authors:
Wenjuan Wu
Wenjuan Wu
The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
United States
Dr Li Yang, PhD
Dr Li Yang, PhD
Monash University
Clayton, Victoria | Australia
Dr. Yan Li, PhD
Dr. Yan Li, PhD
Experimental Therapeutics Centre
Research Fellow
Singapore | Singapore
Jiaqi Feng
Jiaqi Feng
College of Animal Science
College Park | United States
Lechun Lyu
Lechun Lyu
Technology Transfer Center
Li He
Li He
Sichuan University
China

Biotechnol Adv 2017 Nov 17;35(6):751-757. Epub 2017 Jul 17.

Department of Dermatology, First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Institute of Dermatology & Venereology of Yunnan Province, Kunming, Yunnan, China. Electronic address:

Polymorphous light eruption (PLE) which is one of the most common photodermatoses has been demonstrated to be immune-mediated disorder. Resistance to UV-induced immunosuppression resulting from differential immune cells infiltration and cytokines secretion has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of PLE. In this study, we reviewed differential patterns of immune cells infiltrations and cytokines secretion that may contribute to PLE occurrence and development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biotechadv.2017.07.006DOI ListingPossible
November 2017
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