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    Reconstruction of Large Facial Defects via Excision of Skin Cancer Using Two or More Regional Flaps.
    Arch Plast Surg 2017 Jul 15;44(4):319-323. Epub 2017 Jul 15.
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
    Background: Free-flap surgery and skin grafting can be used to reconstruct large facial defects that may result after skin cancer removal by Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). However, these two methods may produce low postsurgical patient satisfaction with aesthetics, and free-flap surgery may produce an undue burden for the majority of skin cancer patients, who are of advanced age. Hence, the authors examined outcomes of large facial defect reconstruction using multiple flaps.

    Methods: Among patients undergoing MMS for skin cancer at Pusan National University Hospital between January 2013 and December 2015, we evaluated 7 patients (2 males, 5 females; average age, 73.14 years) treated for large facial defects from basal cell carcinoma. Based on operative and follow-up records, we investigated the number and type of flaps used, postsurgical complications, and patients' post-surgical satisfaction.

    Results: Two and 3 types of flaps were used for 5 and 2 patients, respectively. Most frequently used were nasolabial flaps (7 times in 6 patients) and forehead flaps (once in each of 4 patients). The average follow-up period was 14 months, with no complications-including necrosis, hematoma, or wound dehiscence-observed. Post-surgical satisfaction averaged 4.4 out of a maximum of 5 points.

    Conclusions: Reconstruction using two or more flaps for large facial defects after skin cancer removal using MMS produced satisfactory outcomes while preventing aesthetic problems. Practitioners should consider using multiple flaps when choosing a reconstruction method for large facial defects following skin cancer removal.

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