Case of childhood polymorphous light eruption provoked by overlap exposure to ultraviolet A and B radiation.

Authors:
Yuki Nomura
Yuki Nomura
United Graduate School of Drug Discovery and Medical Information Sciences
Japan
Naoko Uetsu
Naoko Uetsu
Kansai Medical University
Hirakata | Japan
Yoko Ueki
Yoko Ueki
Kansai Medical University
Fumikazu Yamazaki
Fumikazu Yamazaki
Kansai Medical University
Japan
Reiko Noborio
Reiko Noborio
Nagoya City University of Medical Sciences
Japan
Hiroyuki Okamoto
Hiroyuki Okamoto
National Cancer Center Hospital
Springfield | United States

J Dermatol 2018 Jan 2;45(1):109-110. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Department of Dermatology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.13753DOI ListingPossible
January 2018
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