Erratum to: Palaeoenvironmental drivers of vertebrate community composition in the Belly River Group (Campanian) of Alberta, Canada, with implications for dinosaur biogeography.

Authors:
Thomas M Cullen
Thomas M Cullen
Carleton University
Canada
David C Evans
David C Evans
The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Columbus | United States

BMC Ecol 2017 01 9;17(1). Epub 2017 Jan 9.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-016-0111-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5223555PMC
January 2017
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