Prognostic Importance of Low Admission Serum Creatinine Concentration for Mortality in Hospitalized Patients.

Authors:
Charat Thongprayoon
Charat Thongprayoon
Mayo Clinic
Phoenix | United States
Wisit Cheungpasitporn
Wisit Cheungpasitporn
Bassett Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
United States
Wonngarm Kittanamongkolchai
Wonngarm Kittanamongkolchai
Bassett Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
United States
Dr Andrew M Harrison, MD, PhD
Dr Andrew M Harrison, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Postdoctoral researcher
Clinical Informatics
Rochester, MN | United States
Kianoush Kashani
Kianoush Kashani
Mayo Clinic
United States

Am J Med 2017 May 18;130(5):545-554.e1. Epub 2016 Dec 18.

Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Electronic address:

Objective: The study objective was to assess the association between low serum creatinine value at admission and in-hospital mortality in hospitalized patients.

Methods: This was a retrospective single-center cohort study conducted at a tertiary referral hospital. All hospitalized adult patients between 2011 and 2013 who had an admission creatinine value available were identified for inclusion in this study. Admission creatinine value was categorized into 7 groups: ≤0.4, 0.5 to 0.6, 0.7 to 0.8, 0.9 to 1.0, 1.1 to 1.2, 1.3 to 1.4, and ≥1.5 mg/dL. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Logistic regression analysis was performed to obtain the odds ratio of in-hospital mortality for the various admission creatinine levels, using a creatinine value of 0.7 to 0.8 mg/dL as the reference group in the analysis of all patients and female patients and of 0.9 to 1.0 mg/dL in the analysis of male patients because it was associated with the lowest in-hospital mortality.

Results: Of 73,994 included patients, 973 (1.3%) died in the hospital. The association between different categories of admission creatinine value and in-hospital mortality assumed a U-shaped distribution, with both low and high creatinine values associated with higher in-hospital mortality. After adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, principal diagnosis, and comorbid conditions, very low creatinine value (≤0.4 mg/dL) was significantly associated with increased mortality (odds ratio, 3.29; 95% confidence interval, 2.08-5.00), exceeding the risk related to a markedly increased creatinine value of ≥1.5 mg/dL (odds ratio, 2.56; 95% confidence interval, 2.07-3.17). The association remained significant in the subgroup analysis of male and female patients.

Conclusions: Low creatinine value at admission is independently associated with increased in-hospital mortality in hospitalized patients.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2016.11.020DOI Listing

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May 2017
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