The role of intersection and street design on severity of bicycle-motor vehicle crashes.

Authors:
Morteza Asgarzadeh
Morteza Asgarzadeh
Harvard School of Public Health
Boston | United States
Santosh Verma
Santosh Verma
Center for Injury Epidemiology
New York | United States
Rania A Mekary
Rania A Mekary
MCPHS University
Boston | United States
Theodore K Courtney
Theodore K Courtney
Center for Injury Epidemiology
David C Christiani
David C Christiani
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston | United States

Inj Prev 2017 06 9;23(3):179-185. Epub 2016 Nov 9.

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Safety concerns are a major barrier to cycling. Intersection and street design variables such as intersection angles and street width might contribute to the severity of crashes and the safety concerns. In this study we examined whether these design variables were associated with bicycle-motor vehicle crashes (BMVC) severity.

Methods: Using the geographical information system and latitudes/longitudes recorded by the police using a global positioning device, we extracted intersection angles, street width, bicycle facilities, posted speed limits and annual average daily traffic from 3266 BMVC data from New York City police records. Additional variables about BMVC, including age and sex of the bicyclist, time of the day, road surface conditions, road character, vehicle type and injury severity, were obtained from police reports. Injury severity was classified as severe (incapacitating or killed) or non-severe (non-incapacitating, possible injury). The associations between injury severity and environment design variables were examined using multivariate log-binomial regression model.

Findings: Compared with crashes at orthogonal intersections, crashes at non-orthogonal intersections had 1.37 times (95% CI 1.05 to 1.80) and non-intersection street segments had 1.31 times (95% CI 1.01 to 1.70) higher risk of a severe injury. Crashes that involved a truck or a bus were twice as likely to result in a severe injury outcome; street width was not significantly associated with injury severity.

Conclusion: Crashes at non-orthogonal intersections and non-intersection segments are more likely to result in higher injury severity. The findings can be used to improve road design and develop effective safety interventions.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2016-042045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5502254PMC

Still can't find the full text of the article?

We can help you send a request to the authors directly.
June 2017
37 Reads
1.941 Impact Factor

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

injury severity
16
design variables
12
street width
12
times 95%
8
vehicle crashes
8
intersection angles
8
safety concerns
8
injury
8
angles street
8
severe injury
8
bicycle-motor vehicle
8
intersection street
8
street design
8
non-orthogonal intersections
8
crashes non-orthogonal
8
crashes
7
street
6
severity
6
design
5
non-incapacitating injury
4

References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Motivators and deterrents of bicycling: comparing influences on decisions to ride
Winters et al.
Transport Q 2011
Improving health through policies that promote active travel: a review of evidence to support integrated health impact assessment
de Nazelle et al.
Environ Int 2011
Intensity versus duration of cycling, impact on all-cause and coronary heart disease mortality: the Copenhagen City Heart Study
Schnohr et al.
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil 2012
Walking and cycling to health: a comparative analysis of city, state, and international data
Pucher et al.
Am J Public Health 2010
How to make more cycling good for road safety?
Wegman et al.
Accid Anal Prev 2012
Advancing sustainable safety: National road safety outlook for The Netherlands for 2005–2020
Wegman et al.
2008
Bicycling renaissance in North America? An update and re-appraisal of cycling trends and policies
Pucher et al.
Transport Res A 2011
Commuting by bicycle: an overview of the literature
Heinen et al.
Transport Rev 2010
Deaths of cyclists in London: trends from 1992 to 2006
Morgan et al.
BMC Public Health 2010
Incidence, risk, and protective factors of bicycle crashes: Findings from a prospective cohort study in New Zealand
Tin Tin et al.
Prev Med 2013
Risk factors for causing road crashes involving cyclists: An application of a quasi-induced exposure method
Martínez-Ruiz et al.
Accid Anal Prev 2013

Similar Publications