Burnout in Female Faculty Members.

Authors:
Lisa Cassidy-Vu
Lisa Cassidy-Vu
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Keli Beck
Keli Beck
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Dr. Justin B Moore, PhD, MS
Dr. Justin B Moore, PhD, MS
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Associate Professor
Implementation Science, Epidemiology
Winston-Salem, NC | United States

J Prim Care Community Health 2017 Apr 21;8(2):97-99. Epub 2016 Sep 21.

1 Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

Despite approximately equal numbers of male and female medical school graduates, women are entering academic medicine at a lower rate than their male colleagues. Of those who do assume a faculty position, female faculty members report higher levels of burnout, often attributable to gender-specific difficulties in clinical expectations and maintenance of work-life balance. Many of these struggles are attributable to issues that are amenable to supportive policies, but these policies are inconsistent in their availability and practice. This commentary presents evidence for inconsistencies in the day-to-day experience of female faculty members, and proposes solutions for the mitigation of the challenges experienced more often by female faculty members with the goal of diversifying and strengthening academic medicine.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2150131916669191DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5932657PMC
April 2017
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