Strength Training Prevents Hyperinsulinemia, Insulin Resistance, and Inflammation Independent of Weight Loss in Fructose-Fed Animals.

Authors:
Jose D Botezelli
Jose D Botezelli
São Paulo State University - UNESP
Brazil
Andressa Coope
Andressa Coope
Medical Sciences University
Cincinnati | United States
Ana C Ghezzi
Ana C Ghezzi
Medical Sciences University
Jabalpur | India
Lucieli T Cambri
Lucieli T Cambri
São Paulo State University (UNESP)
Brazil
Leandro P Moura
Leandro P Moura
São Paulo State University (UNESP)
Rania A Mekary
Rania A Mekary
MCPHS University
Boston | United States

Sci Rep 2016 08 4;6:31106. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

Department of Nutrition, Metabolism and Exercise, Campinas State University (UNICAMP), Limeira/SP, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to compare the effects of aerobic, strength, and combined training on metabolic disorders induced by a fructose-rich diet. Wistar rats (120 days old) were randomized into five groups (n = 8-14): C (control diet and sedentary), F (fed the fructose-rich diet and sedentary), FA (fed the fructose-rich diet and subject to aerobic exercise), FS (fed the fructose-rich diet and subject to strength exercise), and FAS (fed the fructose-rich diet and subject to combined aerobic and strength exercises). After the 8-week experiment, glucose homeostasis, blood biochemistry, tissue triglycerides, and inflammation were evaluated and analyzed. The strength protocol exerted greater effects on glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and liver lipid contents than other protocols (all P < 0.05). All three exercise protocols induced a remarkable reduction in inflammation, tissue triglyceride content, and inflammatory pathways, which was achieved through c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and factor nuclear kappa B (NFkB) activation in both the liver and the muscle. Our data suggest that strength training reduced the severity of most of the metabolic disorders induced by a fructose-rich diet and could be the most effective strategy to prevent or treat fructose-induced metabolic diseases.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep31106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4973231PMC

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August 2016
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