[The effectiveness of smoking cessation program in a workplace with high risk].

Tuberk Toraks 2016 Jun;64(2):144-51

Clinic of Chest Diseases, Dr. Suat Seren Chest Diseases and Chest Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey.

Introduction: Initiatives for smoking cessation (SC) at workplace have become more prominent due to both health and safety risks associated with smoking. We aimed to determine 6-month successful SC rates of a group of employees who participated in a SC program as they worked in a workplace that exhibited high risk of fire and explosion.

Materials And Methods: Having delivered a compulsory smoking training to the paint manufacturing department with 276 employees, we invited 147 smoker employees to participate in a SC initiative (SCI) program. The SCI program was implemented by the occupational health and safety (OHS) staff. Employees were administered a self-reported questionnaire including the age at starting smoking, number of cigarettes smoked (pack years), family members' attitudes towards smoking, reasons for smoking and harms of smoking. Nicotine addiction levels were assessed with Fagerström Nicotine Dependence Test (FNDT).

Result: 276 employees (270 male and 6 female) had an average age of 36.8 ± 8.4 years. 144 active smokers presented an average age of 38.4 ± 6.9 and smoked on average 18.5 ± 12.8 pack/year. Active smokers started smoking at the age of 19.8 ± 4.9 on average. Their average score in FNDT was 6.6 ± 1.9 points. Fifty-one (35.4%) employees participated in the SCIs. The participants in the SCP training exhibited statistically significant differences with respect to the following parameters: chronic disease (p= 0.03), pack/year (p< 0.001), age at starting smoking (p= 0.001), attempted methods to SC (p= 0.002), average score in self-reported harms of smoking (p< 0.001), average FNDT score (p< 0.001), average score of self-reported smoking addiction (p= 0.001), and whether the smoker considers smoking a means of socialization (p≤ 0.001). After six months, we observed that 12 (23%) of the participants, and 4 (4%) of the non-participants employees quitted smoking (p< 0.001).

Conclusions: In our study, participants in the SCI exhibited higher SC rates compared to the non-participants. Further studies are required to standardize such initiatives, which improve occupational health.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5578/tt.22112DOI Listing
June 2016

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