Physical activity outcomes in afterschool programs: A group randomized controlled trial.

Authors:
Michael W Beets
Michael W Beets
University of South Carolina
United States
Gabrielle Turner-McGrievy
Gabrielle Turner-McGrievy
University of South Carolina
United States
Jennifer Huberty
Jennifer Huberty
University of South Carolina
United States
Dianne S Ward
Dianne S Ward
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
United States
Russell R Pate
Russell R Pate
University of South Carolina
United States
Darcy Freedman
Darcy Freedman
College of Social Work
Brent Hutto
Brent Hutto
University of South Carolina
United States

Prev Med 2016 09 7;90:207-15. Epub 2016 Jul 7.

College of Education, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, United States.

Introduction: Afterschool programs (ASPs) across the US are working towards achieving the standard of all children accumulating 30min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during program time. This study describes the two-year impact of an intervention designed to assist ASPs meeting the 30min/day MVPA standard.

Methods: Using a two-year delayed treatment, group randomized controlled trial, 20 ASPs serving ~1700 children/year (6-12yrs) were randomized to either an immediate (n=10, baseline-2013 and 2yrs intervention fall-2013-to-spring-2015) or delayed group (n=10, baseline 2013-2014 and 1yr intervention fall-2014-to-spring-2015). The intervention, Strategies-To-Enhance-Practice (STEPs), focused on programming MVPA in the daily schedule, training of staff and leaders, and ongoing technical support/assistance. Accelerometry-derived proportion of children meeting the 30min/day MVPA standard was measured in the spring of each year. Mixed model logistic regressions were used to examine the change in the odds of achieving the MVPA standard. Analyses were conducted in 2015. Data were collected in one southeastern US state.

Results: Immediate boys (n=677) and delayed girls (n=658) increased the percent achieving 30min MVPA/day from 35.9% to 47.0% (odds ratio [OR]=1.88, 95% CI 1.18-3.00) and 13.1% to 19.1% (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.03-1.96). Immediate girls (n=613) and delayed boys (n=687) exhibited a nonsignificant increase from 19.1% to 21.6% (OR=1.20, 95% CI 0.84-1.72) and 29.0% to 31.3% (OR=1.13, 95%CI 0.80-1.58).

Conclusions: STEPs can have an impact on children's MVPA and time spent sedentary, yet was unable to fully achieve the goal of all children accumulating 30minMVPA/day. Additional efforts are need to identify strategies ASPs can use to meet this important public health standard.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5014716PMC

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September 2016
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