Postoperative appointments: which ones count?

Authors:
Margaret G Mueller
Margaret G Mueller
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Dana Elborno
Dana Elborno
Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine
Christina Lewicky-Gaupp
Christina Lewicky-Gaupp
University of Michigan Medical School
United States
Kimberly Kenton
Kimberly Kenton
Loyola University Medical Center
United States

Int Urogynecol J 2016 Dec 16;27(12):1873-1877. Epub 2016 Jun 16.

Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.

Introduction And Hypothesis: Although postoperative complications in women undergoing reconstructive pelvic surgery (RPS) have been characterized, little is known regarding the timeline of these occurrences. We aimed to determine the timeframe after RPS during which the majority of complications occur, to assist with planning intervals between postoperative visits.

Methods: Women undergoing RPS were identified through billing information. Demographic, surgical, and complications data were extracted from electronic medical records. The Pelvic Floor Complication scale is a surgical scale tailored to women undergoing RPS. It contains three subscales: intraoperative, immediately postoperative, and delayed complications. We applied this scale to each postoperative visit (at 2, 6, and 13 weeks).

Results: 396 women underwent RPS and 125 patients had 179 complications, most of which (66 %) were identified by the 2-week visit. Complications at the 2-week visit consisted of urinary tract infection (UTI; 46 %), wound infection (10.0 %), and urinary retention (9.4 %). The majority of serious complications (venous thromboembolism [VTE], ileus, small bowel obstruction [SBO], readmission, and reoperation [1 incarcerated hernia and 1 sling release]) were diagnosed by 2 weeks. One patient was readmitted for ileus at between 2 and 6 weeks. At between 6 and 13 weeks, 1 patient was readmitted with SBO; 1 VTE was diagnosed; and 1 required reoperation for a prolapsed fallopian tube. In contrast, two thirds of the complications seen at the 13-week visit were due to granulation tissue, suture erosion or mesh erosion.

Conclusions: The majority of non-mesh-related complications occur within the first 2 weeks after RPS, whereas mesh and suture complications are more likely to be identified at the 13-week visit.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00192-016-3052-2DOI Listing
December 2016
10 Reads

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

women undergoing
12
complications
10
complications occur
8
2-week visit
8
patient readmitted
8
undergoing rps
8
13-week visit
8
rps
6
visit
5
postoperative
5
thromboembolism [vte]
4
visit 13 weeksresults
4
ileus 6 weeks
4
6 weeks 13 weeks
4
postoperative visit
4
scale postoperative
4
ileus small
4
13 weeksresults 396
4
396 women
4
venous thromboembolism
4

Similar Publications