The microbiome of the oral mucosa in irritable bowel syndrome.

Authors:
Nicolaas H Fourie
Nicolaas H Fourie
University of Cape Town
South Africa
Dan Wang
Dan Wang
College of Life Sciences
Provo | United States
Sarah K Abey
Sarah K Abey
National Institutes of Health
United States
Leeanne B Sherwin
Leeanne B Sherwin
National Institutes of Health
United States
Dr. Paule V Joseph, PhD, RN, MS, FNP-BC, CTN-B
Dr. Paule V Joseph, PhD, RN, MS, FNP-BC, CTN-B
National Institute of Nursing Research
Tenure-Track Investigator (Clinical)
N/A
Bethesda , Maryland | United States
Bridgett Rahim-Williams
Bridgett Rahim-Williams
University of Florida
United States
Eric G Ferguson
Eric G Ferguson
National Institute of Nursing Research

Gut Microbes 2016 07 10;7(4):286-301. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

a Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, DHHS , Bethesda , MD , USA.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disorder characterized by persistent symptoms, including visceral pain. Studies have demonstrated oral microbiome differences in inflammatory bowel diseases suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in the study of non-oral conditions. In this exploratory study we examine whether differences exist in the oral microbiome of IBS participants and healthy controls, and whether the oral microbiome relates to symptom severity. The oral buccal mucosal microbiome of 38 participants was characterized using PhyloChip microarrays. The severity of visceral pain was assessed by orally administering a gastrointestinal test solution. Participants self-reported their induced visceral pain. Pain severity was highest in IBS participants (P = 0.0002), particularly IBS-overweight participants (P = 0.02), and was robustly correlated to the abundance of 60 OTUs, 4 genera, 5 families and 4 orders of bacteria (r > 0.4, P < 0.001). IBS-overweight participants showed decreased richness in the phylum Bacteroidetes (P = 0.007) and the genus Bacillus (P = 0.008). Analysis of β-diversity found significant separation of the IBS-overweight group (P < 0.05). Our oral microbial results are concordant with described fecal and colonic microbiome-IBS and -weight associations. Having IBS and being overweight, rather than IBS-subtypes, was the most important factor in describing the severity of visceral pain and variation in the microbiome. Pain severity was strongly correlated to the abundance of many taxa, suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in diagnosis and patient phenotyping. The oral microbiome has potential as a source of microbial information in IBS.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19490976.2016.1162363DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4988452PMC
July 2016
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References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Article in J Gastroenterol Hepatol
Rautava J et al.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2014

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