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    Single-Fraction Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Patients 80 Years of Age and Older With Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2016 May 30;95(1):542-8. Epub 2015 Nov 30.
    Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan.
    Purpose: In an aging society, many senior citizens want less invasive treatment because of potential medical complications. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences has started to treat stage I lung cancer with single-fraction carbon-ion radiation therapy (CIRT) as a dose escalation prospective phase 1/2 trial. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of CIRT for patients 80 years of age and older, undergoing single-fraction CIRT.

    Methods And Materials: Peripheral non-small cell lung cancer patients who were treated with single-fraction CIRT were prospectively followed. We analyzed the data from among these patients 80 years of age and older.

    Results: There were 70 patients. Median age was 83 years (range: 80-89) and median follow-up period was 42.7 months (range: 12-128 months). Three-year local control, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 88.0%, 81.6%, and 72.4%, respectively. Five-year local control, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 85.8%, 64.9%, and 39.7%, respectively. There were no adverse effects higher than grade 2 either in the acute or late phase in terms of skin and lung. Analgesic agents were necessary for only 5 patients (7.1%), to relieve muscular or rib fracture pain caused by irradiation.

    Conclusions: Single-fraction CIRT was low-risk and effective, even for the elderly.

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