A pilot study investigating the efficacy of botanical anti-inflammatory agents in an OTC eczema therapy.

Authors:
Zoe Diana Draelos
Zoe Diana Draelos
Wake Forest University School of Medicine
United States

J Cosmet Dermatol 2016 Jun 24;15(2):117-9. Epub 2015 Nov 24.

Dermatology Consulting Services, High Point, NC, USA.

Background: Eczema is a frequently encountered dermatologic condition characterized by inflammation resulting in erythema, scaling, induration, and lichenification.

Aims: The objective of this research was to examine the roll of botanical anti-inflammatories in alleviating the signs and symptoms of mild-to-moderate eczema.

Method: A total of 25 subjects 18+ years of age with mild-to-moderate eczema were asked to leave all oral medications and cleansers unchanged substituting the botanical study moisturizer for all topical treatment three times daily for 2 weeks. Investigator, subject, and noninvasive assessments were obtained at baseline and week 2.

Results: There was a highly statistically significant (P < 0.001) improvement in investigator-assessed irritation, erythema, desquamation, roughness, dryness, lichenification, itching, and overall skin appearance after 2 weeks of botanical anti-inflammatory moisturizer use. Overall, a 79% reduction in itching was noted. Skin hydration as measured by corneometry increased 44% increase (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: The study moisturizer containing the occlusive ingredients of dimethicone and shea butter oil; the humectant ingredients of glycerin, vitamin B, sodium PCA, and sodium hyaluronate; the barrier repair ingredients of ceramide 3, cholesterol, phytosphingosine, ceramide 6 II, and ceramide 1; and the botanical anti-inflammatories allantoin and bisabolol were helpful in reducing the signs and symptoms of mild-to-moderate eczema.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.12199DOI Listing
June 2016
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