A Wave of Regulatory T Cells into Neonatal Skin Mediates Tolerance to Commensal Microbes.

Immunity 2015 Nov;43(5):1011-21

Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Electronic address:

The skin is a site of constant dialog between the immune system and commensal bacteria. However, the molecular mechanisms that allow us to tolerate the presence of skin commensals without eliciting destructive inflammation are unknown. Using a model system to study the antigen-specific response to S. epidermidis, we demonstrated that skin colonization during a defined period of neonatal life was required for establishing immune tolerance to commensal microbes. This crucial window was characterized by an abrupt influx of highly activated regulatory T (Treg) cells into neonatal skin. Selective inhibition of this Treg cell wave completely abrogated tolerance. Thus, the host-commensal relationship in the skin relied on a unique Treg cell population that mediated tolerance to bacterial antigens during a defined developmental window. This suggests that the cutaneous microbiome composition in neonatal life is crucial in shaping adaptive immune responses to commensals, and disrupting these interactions might have enduring health implications.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2015.10.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4654993PMC
November 2015
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