Meta-analysis of modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

Authors:
Wei Xu
Wei Xu
The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University
Nanjing Shi | China
Lan Tan
Lan Tan
Qingdao Municipal Hospital
Qingdao Shi | China
Hui-Fu Wang
Hui-Fu Wang
Qingdao Municipal Hospital
China
Teng Jiang
Teng Jiang
Nanjing First Hospital
Nanjing Shi | China
Meng-Shan Tan
Meng-Shan Tan
Qingdao Municipal Hospital
China
Lin Tan
Lin Tan
Qingdao Municipal Hospital
Qingdao Shi | China
Qing-Fei Zhao
Qing-Fei Zhao
Qingdao University
China
Jie-Qiong Li
Jie-Qiong Li
Beijing Children's Hospital
China

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2015 Dec 20;86(12):1299-306. Epub 2015 Aug 20.

Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Qingdao, China College of Medicine and Pharmaceutics, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China Department of Neurology, Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

Background: The aetiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is believed to involve environmental exposure and genetic susceptibility. The aim of our present systematic review and meta-analysis was to roundly evaluate the association between AD and its modifiable risk factors.

Methods: We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception to July 2014, and the references of retrieved relevant articles. We included prospective cohort studies and retrospective case-control studies.

Results: 16,906 articles were identified of which 323 with 93 factors met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. Among factors with relatively strong evidence (pooled population >5000) in our meta-analysis, we found grade I evidence for 4 medical exposures (oestrogen, statin, antihypertensive medications and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy) as well as 4 dietary exposures (folate, vitamin E/C and coffee) as protective factors of AD. We found grade I evidence showing that one biochemical exposure (hyperhomocysteine) and one psychological condition (depression) significantly increase risk of developing AD. We also found grade I evidence indicative of complex roles of pre-existing disease (frailty, carotid atherosclerosis, hypertension, low diastolic blood pressure, type 2 diabetes mellitus (Asian population) increasing risk whereas history of arthritis, heart disease, metabolic syndrome and cancer decreasing risk) and lifestyle (low education, high body mass index (BMI) in mid-life and low BMI increasing the risk whereas cognitive activity, current smoking (Western population), light-to-moderate drinking, stress, high BMI in late-life decreasing the risk) in influencing AD risk. We identified no evidence suggestive of significant association with occupational exposures.

Conclusions: Effective interventions in diet, medications, biochemical exposures, psychological condition, pre-existing disease and lifestyle may decrease new incidence of AD.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2015-310548DOI Listing
December 2015
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