Making Healthy Eating Policy Practice: A Group Randomized Controlled Trial on Changes in Snack Quality, Costs, and Consumption in After-School Programs.

Authors:
Michael W Beets
Michael W Beets
University of South Carolina
United States
Gabrielle Turner-McGrievy
Gabrielle Turner-McGrievy
University of South Carolina
United States
Jennifer Huberty
Jennifer Huberty
University of South Carolina
United States
Dianne S Ward
Dianne S Ward
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
United States
Darcy Freedman
Darcy Freedman
College of Social Work
Brent Hutto
Brent Hutto
University of South Carolina
United States
Dr. Justin B Moore, PhD, MS
Dr. Justin B Moore, PhD, MS
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Associate Professor
Implementation Science, Epidemiology
Winston-Salem, NC | United States

Am J Health Promot 2016 09 17;30(7):521-31. Epub 2016 Jun 17.

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate an intervention designed to assist after-school programs (ASPs) in meeting snack nutrition policies that specify that a fruit or vegetable be served daily and sugar-sweetened beverages/foods and artificially flavored foods eliminated.

Design: The study used a 1-year group-randomized controlled trial.

Setting: The study took place in ASPs operating in South Carolina, United States.

Subjects: Twenty ASPs serving over 1700 children were recruited, match-paired postbaseline on enrollment size and days fruits/vegetables were served per week, and randomized to either intervention (n = 10) or control (n = 10) groups.

Intervention: The study used Strategies To Enhance Practice for Healthy Eating (STEPs-HE), a multistep adaptive intervention framework that assists ASP leaders and staff to serve snacks that meet nutrition policies while maintaining cost.

Measures: Direct observation of snacks served and consumed and monthly snack expenditures as determined by receipts were used.

Analysis: The study used nonparametric and mixed-model repeated measures.

Results: By postassessment, intervention ASPs increased serving of fruits/vegetables to 3.9 ± 2.1 vs. 0.7 ± 1.7 d/wk and decreased serving sugar-sweetened beverages to 0.1 ± 0.7 vs. 1.8 ± 2.4 d/wk and sugar-sweetened foods to 0.3 ± 1.1 vs. 2.7 ± 2.5 d/wk compared to controls, respectively. Cost of snacks increased by $0.02/snack in the intervention ASPs ($0.36 to $0.38) compared to a $0.01 per snack decrease in the control group ($0.39 to $0.38). Across both assessments and groups, 80% to 100% of children consumed FVs.

Conclusions: The STEPs-HE intervention can assist ASPs in meeting nationally endorsed nutrition policies with marginal increases in cost.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4278/ajhp.141001-QUAN-486DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5594564PMC

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September 2016
29 Reads
4 Citations

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