Accidental exposures to peanut in a large cohort of Canadian children with peanut allergy.

Clin Transl Allergy 2015 2;5:16. Epub 2015 Apr 2.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB Canada.

Background: We previously estimated that the annual rate of accidental exposure to peanut in 1411 children with peanut allergy, followed for 2227 patient-years, was 11.9% (95% CI, 10.6, 13.5). This cohort has increased to 1941 children, contributing 4589 patient-years, and we determined the annual incidence of accidental exposure, described the severity, management, location, and identified associated factors.

Findings: Children with physician-confirmed peanut allergy were recruited from Canadian allergy clinics and allergy advocacy organizations from 2004 to May 2014. Parents completed questionnaires regarding accidental exposure to peanut over the preceding year. Five hundred and sixty-seven accidental exposures occurred in 429 children over 4589 patient-years, yielding an annual incidence rate of 12.4% (95% CI, 11.4, 13.4). Of 377 accidental exposures that were moderate or severe, only 109 (28.9%) sought medical attention and of these 109, only 40 (36.7%) received epinephrine. Of the 181 moderate/severe accidental exposures treated outside a health care facility, only 11.6% received epinephrine. Thirty-seven percent of accidental exposures occurred at home. In multivariate analyses, longer disease duration, recruitment through an allergy advocacy association, and having other food allergies decreased the likelihood of accidental exposures. Age ≥ 13 years at study entry and living with a single parent increased the risk.

Conclusion: Despite increased awareness, accidental exposures continue to occur, mainly at home, and most are managed inappropriately by both health care professionals and caregivers. Consequently, more education is required on the importance of strict allergen avoidance and the need for prompt and correct management of anaphylaxis.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13601-015-0055-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4389801PMC

Still can't find the full text of the article?

We can help you send a request to the authors directly.
April 2015
2 Reads

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

accidental exposures
28
accidental exposure
12
peanut allergy
12
accidental
10
exposures occurred
8
annual incidence
8
exposure peanut
8
health care
8
children peanut
8
received epinephrine
8
4589 patient-years
8
allergy advocacy
8
exposures
6
peanut
6
allergy
6
children
5
95% 114
4
awareness accidental
4
rate 124%
4
severe 109
4

References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Article in J Allergy Clin Immunol
AT Clark et al.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2008
Article in Clin Exp Allergy
PW Ewan et al.
Clin Exp Allergy 2005
Article in Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol
DL Neuman-Sunshine et al.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012
Article in J Pediatr
TK Vander Leek et al.
J Pediatr 2000
Article in J Allergy Clin Immunol
SA Bock et al.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 1989
Article in Clin Exp Allergy
JO Hourihane et al.
Clin Exp Allergy 1997
Article in Pediatr Allergy Immunol
NU Nguyen-Luu et al.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012
Article in J Allergy Clin Immunol
JW Yu et al.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2006
Article in Clin Exp Allergy
E Lavine et al.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015
Article in Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol
M Ben-Shoshan et al.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2008
Article in J Allergy Clin Immunol
TT Perry et al.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2004

Similar Publications