Weight training, aerobic physical activities, and long-term waist circumference change in men.

Authors:
Morteza Asgarzadeh
Morteza Asgarzadeh
Harvard School of Public Health
Boston | United States
Walter C Willett
Walter C Willett
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston | United States
Eric B Rimm
Eric B Rimm
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston | United States
Edward Giovannucci
Edward Giovannucci
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston | United States

Obesity (Silver Spring) 2015 Feb 19;23(2):461-7. Epub 2014 Dec 19.

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Objective: Findings on weight training and waist circumference (WC) change are controversial. This study examined prospectively whether weight training, moderate to vigorous aerobic activity (MVAA), and replacement of one activity for another were associated with favorable changes in WC and body weight (BW).

Methods: Physical activity, WC, and BW were reported in 1996 and 2008 in a cohort of 10,500 healthy U.S. men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Multiple linear regression models (partition/substitution) to assess these associations were used.

Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, a significant inverse dose-response relationship between weight training and WC change (P-trend <0.001) was observed. Less age-associated WC increase was seen with a 20-min/day activity increase; this benefit was significantly stronger for weight training (-0.67 cm, 95% CI -0.93, -0.41) than for MVAA (-0.33 cm, 95% CI -0.40, -0.27), other activities (-0.16 cm, 95% CI -0.28, -0.03), or TV watching (0.08 cm, 95% CI 0.05, 0.12). Substituting 20 min/day of weight training for any other discretionary activity had the strongest inverse association with WC change. MVAA had the strongest inverse association with BW change (-0.23 kg, 95% CI -0.29, -0.17).

Conclusions: Among various activities, weight training had the strongest association with less WC increase. Studies on frequency/volume of weight training and WC change are warranted.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.20949DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4310793PMC

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February 2015
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Sarcopenia: effects on body composition and function
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J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2003
Strength training for obesity prevention in midlife women
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