Role of SAGA in the asymmetric segregation of DNA circles during yeast ageing.

Authors:
Dr Annina Denoth-Lippuner
Dr Annina Denoth-Lippuner
Brain Research Institute
Zürich | Switzerland
Marek Konrad Krzyzanowski
Marek Konrad Krzyzanowski
Institute of Biochemistry
Catherine Stober
Catherine Stober
Institute of Biochemistry
Chennai | India
Yves Barral
Yves Barral
Institute of Biochemistry
Switzerland

Elife 2014 Nov 17;3. Epub 2014 Nov 17.

Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Biology, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.

In eukaryotes, intra-chromosomal recombination generates DNA circles, but little is known about how cells react to them. In yeast, partitioning of such circles to the mother cell at mitosis ensures their loss from the population but promotes replicative ageing. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of partitioning are debated. In this study, we show that the SAGA complex mediates the interaction of non-chromosomal DNA circles with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and thereby promotes their confinement in the mother cell. Reciprocally, this causes retention and accumulation of NPCs, which affects the organization of ageing nuclei. Thus, SAGA prevents the spreading of DNA circles by linking them to NPCs, but unavoidably causes accumulation of circles and NPCs in the mother cell, and thereby promotes ageing. Together, our data provide a unifying model for the asymmetric segregation of DNA circles and how age affects nuclear organization.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03790DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4232608PMC

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November 2014
7 Reads
17 PubMed Central Citations(source)
8.52 Impact Factor

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