High rates of sexually transmissible infections in HIV-positive patients in the Australian HIV Observational Database: a prospective cohort study.

Authors:
Brian P Mulhall
Brian P Mulhall
Center for Liver Diseases
Stephen Wright
Stephen Wright
University of Toronto
Toronto | Canada
Debbie Allen
Debbie Allen
University of Birmingham
United Kingdom
Katherine Brown
Katherine Brown
Coventry University
United Kingdom
Miriam Grotowski
Miriam Grotowski
Tamworth Sexual Health Service
Eva Jackson
Eva Jackson
Nepean Hospital
Kathy Petoumenos
Kathy Petoumenos
The Kirby Institute

Sex Health 2014 Sep;11(4):291-7

The Kirby Institute for Infection and Immunity in Society, Wallace Wurth Building, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.

Unlabelled: Background In HIV-positive people, sexually transmissible infections (STIs) probably increase the infectiousness of HIV.

Methods: In 2010, we established a cohort of individuals (n=554) from clinics in the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD). We calculated retrospective rates for four STIs for 2005-10 and prospective incidence rates for 2010-11.

Results: At baseline (2010), patient characteristics were similar to the rest of AHOD. Overall incidence was 12.5 per 100 person-years. Chlamydial infections increased from 3.4 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9-5.7) in 2005 to 6.7 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 4.5-9.5) in 2011, peaking in 2010 (8.1 per 100 person-years; 95% CI: 5.6-11.2). Cases were distributed among rectal (61.9%), urethral (34%) and pharyngeal (6.3%) sites. Gonococcal infections increased, peaking in 2010 (4.7 per 100 person-years; 95% CI: 5.6-11.2; Ptrend=0.0099), distributed among rectal (63.9%), urethral (27.9%) and pharyngeal (14.8%) sites. Syphilis showed several peaks, the largest in 2008 (5.3 per 100 person-years; 95% CI: 3.3-8.0); the overall trend was not significant (P=0.113). Genital warts declined from 7.5 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 4.8-11.3) in 2005 to 2.4 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 1.1-4.5) in 2011 (Ptrend=0.0016).

Conclusions: For chlamydial and gonococcal infections, incidence was higher than previous Australian estimates among HIV-infected men who have sex with men, increasing during 2005-2011. Rectal infections outnumbered infections at other sites. Syphilis incidence remained high but did not increase; that of genital warts was lower and decreased.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/SH13074DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4390394PMC

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September 2014
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