Genetic diversity in Enterocytozoon bieneusi isolates from dogs and cats in China: host specificity and public health implications.

Authors:
Dr Md Robiul Karim, PhD
Dr Md Robiul Karim, PhD
Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University
Assistant Professor
Cryptosporidium, Giardia, Microsporidium, Molecular epidemiology, Population genetics
Gazipur | Bangladesh
Haiju Dong
Haiju Dong
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine
Gainesville | United States
Fuchang Yu
Fuchang Yu
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine
Gainesville | United States
Fuchun Jian
Fuchun Jian
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine
China
Dr. Longxian Zhang, PhD
Dr. Longxian Zhang, PhD
Henan Agricultural University
Distinguished professor
Veterinary parasitology
Zhengzhou, Henan | China
Rongjun Wang
Rongjun Wang
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine
China
Sumei Zhang
Sumei Zhang
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine
Gainesville | United States
Farzana Islam Rume
Farzana Islam Rume
Patuakhali Science and Technology University
পটুয়াখালী | Bangladesh

J Clin Microbiol 2014 Sep 2;52(9):3297-302. Epub 2014 Jul 2.

Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

To explore the genetic diversity, host specificity, and zoonotic potential of Enterocytozoon bieneusi, feces from 348 stray and pet dogs and 96 pet cats from different locations in China were examined by internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based PCR. E. bieneusi was detected in 15.5% of the dogs, including 20.5% of stray dogs and 11.7% of pet dogs, and in 11.5% of the pet cats. Higher infection rates were recorded in the >2-year and the 1- to 2-year age groups in dogs and cats, respectively. Altogether, 24 genotypes, including 11 known and 13 new, were detected in 65 infected animals. In 54 positive dogs, 18 genotypes, 9 known (PtEbIX, O, D, CM1, EbpA, Peru8, type IV, EbpC, and PigEBITS5) and 9 new (CD1 to CD9), were found. In contrast, 8 genotypes, 4 known (D, BEB6, I, and PtEbIX) and 4 new (CC1 to CC4), were identified in 11 infected cats. The dominant genotype in dogs was PtEbIX (26/54). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 8 known genotypes (D, Peru8, type IV, CM1, EbpC, PigEBITS5, O, and EbpA) and 7 new genotypes (CD1 to CD4 and CC2 to CC4) were the members of zoonotic group 1, whereas genotypes CD7, CD8, and CD9 together with PtEbIX belonged to the dog-specific group, and genotypes CD6 and CC1 were placed in group 2 with BEB6 and I. Conversely, genotype CD5 clustered with CM4 without belonging to any previous groups. We conclude that zoonotic genotypes are common in dogs and cats, as are host-specific genotypes in dogs.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01352-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4313153PMC

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September 2014
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