Cutaneous lymphoma of the tarsus in cats: 23 cases (2000-2012).

Authors:
Holly D Burr
Holly D Burr
Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
John H Keating
John H Keating
Department of Clinical Sciences
United States
Craig A Clifford
Craig A Clifford
Red Bank Veterinary Hospital
Tinton Falls | United States

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2014 Jun;244(12):1429-34

Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Objective: To determine features of lymphoma of the tarsus in cats.

Design: Multi-institutional retrospective study.

Animals: 23 cats with cutaneous lymphoma of the tarsus.

Procedures: Veterinary oncologists were requested to submit cases fitting the following criteria: histologically or cytologically confirmed lymphoma with a location at or near the tarsus and described as subcutaneous or mass-like. Data regarding breed, sex, age, FeLV and FIV status, and reason for evaluation were collected. Results of staging tests, location of the tumor, immunophenotype, and histopathologic description were recorded. Type of treatments, outcome, survival time, presence or absence of progressive disease, and cause of death or reason for euthanasia were also recorded.

Results: Most cats were older, with a median age of 12 years (range, 7 to 18 years). No association with positive retroviral status was found. Popliteal lymph node involvement at diagnosis was reported in 5 cats, and a suspicion of lymphoma at a different site on the basis of results of abdominal ultrasonography was reported in 4 cats. Treatments were variable and included corticosteroids alone (n = 2), chemotherapy (9), radiation and chemotherapy (7), or surgery with or without chemotherapy (5). Thirteen cats were reported to have lymphoma at a different site at the time of last follow-up, death, or euthanasia. Median survival time for all cats in the study was 190 days (range, 17 to 1,011 days).

Conclusions And Clinical Relevance: Results suggested that tarsal lymphoma is an uncommon manifestation of lymphoma in cats, and in this study was most commonly nonepitheliotropic and of high grade as determined on histologic evaluation. Systemic involvement was identified; therefore, thorough staging is recommended prior to initiating treatment. Future studies are warranted to evaluate effective treatment protocols.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.244.12.1429DOI Listing

Still can't find the full text of the article?

Sign up to send a request to the authors directly.
June 2014
49 Reads

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

survival time
8
lymphoma site
8
reported cats
8
cats
8
cats study
8
cutaneous lymphoma
8
lymphoma tarsus
8
lymphoma
7
thirteen cats
4
site basis
4
basis abdominal
4
abdominal ultrasonography
4
suspicion lymphoma
4
cats suspicion
4
involvement diagnosis
4
diagnosis reported
4
chemotherapy thirteen
4
ultrasonography reported
4
cats treatments
4
corticosteroids chemotherapy
4

References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Article in J Am Anim Hosp Assoc
Hardy WD et al.
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1981
Article in J Am Vet Med Assoc
Tobey JC et al.
J Am Vet Med Assoc 1994
Article in J Am Vet Med Assoc
Dallman MJ et al.
J Am Vet Med Assoc 1982
Article in J Am Anim Hosp Assoc
Caciolo PL et al.
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1983
Article in J Am Anim Hosp Assoc
Caciolo PL et al.
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1984
Article in Can Vet J
Dust A et al.
Can Vet J 1982
Article in J Am Anim Hosp Assoc
Baker JL et al.
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1989
Article in J Am Vet Med Assoc
Schick RO et al.
J Am Vet Med Assoc 1993

Similar Publications