Impact of immunosuppression on recall immune responses to influenza vaccination in stable renal transplant recipients.

Authors:
Michelle Cowan
Michelle Cowan
Stobhill Hospital
United States
Amishi Desai
Amishi Desai
Winthrop University Hospital
Sarah Andrews
Sarah Andrews
Vaccine Research Center
Yaohui Bai
Yaohui Bai
Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology
China
Vic Veguilla
Vic Veguilla
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
Atlanta | United States
Jacqueline M Katz
Jacqueline M Katz
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
Atlanta | United States
Michelle A Josephson
Michelle A Josephson
University of Chicago
Chicago | United States

Transplantation 2014 Apr;97(8):846-53

1 Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. 2 Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. 3 Department of Pathology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. 4 Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. 5 Atlanta Research and Education Foundation, Atlanta, GA. 6 Address correspondence to: Anita S. Chong, Ph.D., The University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637.

Background: The recommendation by the American Society of Transplantation for annual trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination greater than 3 to 6 months post-kidney transplantation provides a unique opportunity to test the in vivo impact of immunosuppression on recall T- and B-cell responses to influenza vaccination.

Methods: This study took advantage of recent breakthroughs in the single-cell quantification of human peripheral blood B-cell responses to prospectively evaluate both B- and T-cell responses to the seasonal (2010 and 2011) influenza vaccine in 23 stable renal transplant recipients and 22 healthy controls.

Results And Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the early B-cell response to influenza vaccination, quantified by the frequency of influenza-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) in peripheral blood, was significantly reduced in stable transplant recipients compared to healthy controls. The magnitude of the seroresponse and the rate of seroconversion were also blunted. The influenza-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ) T-cell response was significantly reduced in transplant recipients; however, there was no correlation between the magnitude of the influenza-specific IgG ASC and IFNγ responses. The induction of memory T- and B-cell responses to influenza vaccination supports the recommendation to vaccinate while the blunted responses demonstrate the efficacy of immunosuppression in controlling memory responses individual transplant recipients.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.TP.0000438024.10375.2dDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4843769PMC

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April 2014
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