[Influence of educational status, burn area and coping behaviors on the complication of psychological disorders in severely burned patients].

Zhonghua Shao Shang Za Zhi 2013 Apr;29(2):195-200

The First Clinic School of Ji'nan University, Guangzhou 510630, China.

Objective: To discuss how the educational status, burn area and coping behaviors influence the psychological disorders in severely burned patients.

Methods: Sixty-four severely burned patients hospitalized in Guangzhou Red Cross Hospital, Guangdong Provincial Work Injury Rehabilitation Center, and Guangdong General Hospital were enrolled with cluster random sampling method. Data of their demography and situation of burns were collected. Then their coping behavior, psychological disorders including anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) plus its core symptoms of flashback, avoidance, and hypervigilance were assessed by medical coping modes questionnaire, self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS), PTSD checklist-civilian version (PCL-C) respectively. Correlation was analyzed between demography, burn area, coping behavior and psychological disorders. The predictive powers of educational status, burn area and coping behaviors on the psychological disorders were analyzed. The qualitative variables were assigned values. Data were processed with t test, Spearman rank correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression analysis.

Results: (1) The patients scored (19.0 ± 3.4) points in confrontation coping behavior, which showed no statistically significant difference from the domestic norm score (19.5 ± 3.8) points (t = -1.13, P > 0.05). The patients scored (16.6 ± 2.4) and (11.0 ± 2.2) points in avoidance and resignation coping behaviors, which were significantly higher than the domestic norm score (14.4 ± 3.0), (8.8 ± 3.2) points (with t values respectively 7.06 and 7.76, P values both below 0.01). The patients' standard score of SAS, SDS, PCL-C were (50 ± 11), (54 ± 11), and (38 ± 12) points. Respectively 89.1% (57/64), 60.9% (39/64), 46.9% (30/64) of the patients showed anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms. (2) Four independent variables: age, gender, marital status, and time after burns, were correlated with the psychological disorders, but the correlativity was not statistically significant (with rs values from -0.089 to 0.245, P values all above 0.05). Educational status was significantly negatively correlated with anxiety, depression, PTSD and its core symptoms of flashback, avoidance (with rs values from -0.361 to -0.253, P values all below 0.05). Educational status was negatively correlated with hypervigilance, but the correlativity was not statistically significant (rs = -0.187, P > 0.05). Burn area was significantly positively correlated with the psychological disorders (with rs values from 0.306 to 0.478, P values all below 0.05). Confrontation coping behavior was positively correlated with the psychological disorders, but the correlativity was not statistically significant (with rs values from 0.121 to 0.550, P values all above 0.05). Avoidance coping behavior was correlated with the psychological disorders, but the correlativity was not statistically significant (with rs values from -0.144 to 0.193, P values all above 0.05). Resignation coping behavior was significantly positively correlated with the psychological disorder (with rs values from 0.377 to 0.596, P values all below 0.01). (3) Educational status had predictive power on the anxiety, PTSD and flash back symptoms of patients (with t values from -2.19 to -2.02, P values all below 0.05), but not on depression, avoidance and hypervigilance (with t values from -1.95 to -0.99, P values all above 0.05). Burn area had no predictive power on the psychological disorders (with t values from 0.55 to 1.78, P values all above 0.05). Resignation coping behavior had predictive power on the psychological disorders (with t values from 3.10 to 6.46, P values below 0.01). Confrontation and avoidance coping behaviors had no predictive power on the psychological disorders (with t values from 0.46 to 2.32 and -0.89 and 1.75 respectively, P values all above 0.05).

Conclusions: The severely burned patients with lower educational status, larger burn area, and the more frequently adapted resignation coping behavior are more likely to suffer from anxiety, depression, and PTSD.

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April 2013
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