Sex steroid hormone levels and body composition in men.

Authors:
Margaret A Gates
Margaret A Gates
Channing Laboratory
Boston | United States
Rania A Mekary
Rania A Mekary
MCPHS University
Boston | United States
Gretchen R Chiu
Gretchen R Chiu
New England Research Institutes
United States
Eric L Ding
Eric L Ding
Harvard School of Public Health
Boston | United States
Gary A Wittert
Gary A Wittert
University of Adelaide
Adelaide | Australia
Andre B Araujo
Andre B Araujo
New England Research Institutes
Watertown | United States

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2013 Jun 26;98(6):2442-50. Epub 2013 Apr 26.

New England Research Institutes, 9 Galen Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 02472, USA.

Background: Previous studies indicate that testosterone (T) is positively correlated with lean mass and inversely correlated with fat mass in men; however, the directionality of these associations, as well as the association with other hormones including estradiol (E2) and SHBG, is unclear.

Methods: We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of E2, T, SHBG, and E2/T ratio with body composition among men ages 30 to 79 in the Boston Area Community Health/Bone Survey. Total, trunk, and appendicular lean and fat mass were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at baseline, and weight and waist/hip circumference were measured at baseline and follow-up. Partial Pearson correlation coefficients were used to estimate the linear relationship between each body composition measure and log-transformed hormone variable.

Results: In cross-sectional analyses of 821 men, T, calculated free T, and SHBG were inversely correlated with fat mass, weight, body mass index, waist/hip circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio, with multivariable-adjusted correlations ranging from -0.13 to -0.37. Calculated free E2 was positively correlated with percentage total (r = .13) and trunk (r = .15) fat mass, and E2/T was positively correlated with all measures examined (r = .13-.40). There were no significant multivariable-adjusted longitudinal associations between baseline hormone levels and change in weight, body mass index, waist/hip circumference, or waist-to-hip ratio after an average follow-up of 4.8 years.

Conclusions: We observed significant cross-sectional associations between hormone levels, including E2, T, and E2/T, and body composition measures in men. Longitudinal analyses showing no influence of baseline hormone levels on change in anthropometric measures imply that body composition affects hormone levels and not the reverse.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2012-2582DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3667256PMC

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June 2013
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