The effect of oral anticoagulation on the prevalence and management of haematuria in a contemporary Australian patient cohort.

BJU Int 2012 Dec;110 Suppl 4:80-4

Department of Urology, The Alfred Hospital, Prahran, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: • To examine the effect of oral anticoagulation (OA) on the prevalence and inpatient management of haematuria in a contemporary Australian patient cohort.

Patients And Methods: • Patients across all inpatient units who had diagnosis-related group (DRG) coding for haematuria were identified from April 2010 to September 2011. • A retrospective chart review was performed to identify the type of anticoagulation (if any), requirement for bladder irrigation or blood transfusion, length of stay (LOS) and cause of haematuria. • Patients for whom the anticoagulation status was uncertain were excluded from analysis. • Statistical significance was determined by Pearson's chi-square tests and Student's t-tests.

Results: • In all, 335 admissions with DRG coding for haematuria were identified from hospital records, of which 268 admissions had clear documentation of anticoagulation. There were 118 emergency admissions and 150 elective admissions for day case cystoscopy. The mean age of the patients was 66 years and the male:female ratio was 5:1. In all, 123 admissions were for patients on some form of anticoagulation (46%). • Patients were on anticoagulation in 53% of the 118 emergency admissions for gross haematuria. These comprised patients on aspirin (28%), clopidogrel (4%), warfarin (10%), combined aspirin and warfarin (1%) and combined aspirin and clopidogrel (10%). • The use of OA was a significant predictor of the need for intervention among the 118 emergency admissions (86% vs 62%, P = 0.003). • In particular, dual antiplatelet therapy in the form of aspirin and clopidogrel was associated with an increased requirement for bladder irrigation (92%) when compared with patients on other forms of anticoagulation (84%) or none at all (62%, P = 0.01). • The mean LOS for patients admitted to hospital with haematuria was 5.6 days. Patients on warfarin had a statistically significant longer LOS than the other groups (13.7 vs 4.5 days, P < 0.001). A cause for haematuria was identified in 120 of the 234 patients (51%). Of these, the most common was benign prostatic hyperplasia (21%), followed by bladder urothelial carcinoma (17%).

Conclusion: • In our cohort of patients, about half of all admissions with haematuria were for patients on some form of OA. • OA use increased the need for intervention, especially for patients on dual antiplatelet therapy.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2012.11622.xDOI Listing
December 2012
21 Reads

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

patients
13
emergency admissions
12
118 emergency
12
12
haematuria identified
12
• patients
12
haematuria
9
antiplatelet therapy
8
requirement bladder
8
combined aspirin
8
bladder irrigation
8
dual antiplatelet
8
oral anticoagulation
8
coding haematuria
8
management haematuria
8
drg coding
8
aspirin clopidogrel
8
anticoagulation prevalence
8
australian patient
8
patients form
8

Similar Publications