Differential predictors of medication adherence in HIV: findings from a sample of African American and Caucasian HIV-positive drug-using adults.

AIDS Patient Care STDS 2012 Oct 13;26(10):621-30. Epub 2012 Aug 13.

Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, USA.

Modest or even occasional nonadherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can result in adverse clinical outcomes. African Americans demonstrate lower rates of adherence than Caucasians or Latinos. Identifying factors that influence medication adherence among African Americans is a critical step toward reducing HIV/AIDS disease progression and mortality. In a sample of 181 African American (n=144) and Caucasian (n=37) HIV-positive drug-using individuals [age (M=42.31; SD=6.6) education (M=13.41; SD=2.1)], we examined the influence of baseline drug use, literacy, neurocognition, depression, treatment-specific social support, and patient satisfaction with health care provider on medication adherence averaged over the course of 6 months (study dates 2002-2006). Our findings suggest differential baseline predictors of medication adherence for African Americans and Caucasians, such that patient satisfaction with provider was the strongest predictor of follow-up medication adherence for African Americans whereas for Caucasians depressive symptoms and treatment-specific social support were predictive of medication adherence (after controlling for duration of drug use).

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/apc.2012.0157DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3462386PMC
October 2012

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