Question 3. Should stimulants be administered to manage difficulties with attention, hyperactivity and impulsivity following paediatric acquired brain injury?

Authors:
David W Harvey
David W Harvey
University of Leeds
United Kingdom
Dr. Matthew Morrall
Dr. Matthew Morrall
The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust
Consultant Paediatric Neuropsychologist
Epilepsies, neurooncology, traumatic brain injury and neuro-rehabilitation.
Leeds, UK | United Kingdom
Deborah Murdoch-Eaton
Deborah Murdoch-Eaton
University of Leeds
United Kingdom

Arch Dis Child 2012 Aug;97(8):755-8

Clinical Psychology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2012-302250DOI Listing
August 2012
4 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
2.90 Impact Factor

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

difficulties attention
4
manage difficulties
4
paediatric acquired
4
attention hyperactivity
4
hyperactivity impulsivity
4
impulsivity paediatric
4
acquired brain
4
brain injury?
4
question stimulants
4
administered manage
4
stimulants administered
4
brain
1
acquired
1
injury?
1
hyperactivity
1
manage
1
administered
1
difficulties
1
attention
1
impulsivity
1

Similar Publications

Central nervous system stimulants for secondary attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder after paediatric traumatic brain injury: a rationale and protocol for single patient (n-of-1) multiple cross-over trials.

BMC Pediatr 2013 May 28;13:89. Epub 2013 May 28.

Discipline of General Practice, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, 11 Salisbury Rd, Ipswich 4305, Australia.

Background: It is estimated that 22,800 children were living with an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) (0.6% of children aged under 15 years) in Australia during 2003. Many children after a traumatic brain injury will experience difficulties with attention and concentration; a condition termed secondary Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder. Read More

View Article
May 2013

Methylphenidate treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder secondary to traumatic brain injury: a critical appraisal of treatment studies.

CNS Spectr 2004 Mar;9(3):217-26

Department of Psychiatry, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York, USA.

Objective: Are stimulants effective in treating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder secondary to traumatic brain injury (ADHD/TBI)? The authors reviewed and examined the current knowledge on efficacy of stimulant treatment ADHD/TBI.

Method: A systematic review of the literature using a quality assessment scale to assess the quality of randomized clinical trials was undertaken. We identified all studies in which stimulants had been administered to individuals with ADHD/TBI. Read More

View Article
March 2004

The answerable question and a hierarchy of evidence.

Authors:
John Hamilton

J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2005 Jun;44(6):596-600

The Permanente Medical Group, Inc., Sacramento, CA, USA.

View Article
June 2005

The use of methylphenidate in paediatric traumatic brain injury.

Pediatr Rehabil 1997 Jan-Mar;1(1):15-7

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor 48109-0239, USA.

Methylphenidate (MPH) has been used safely and effectively for many years in children for the treatment of attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADHD). Behavioural and cognitive sequelae to traumatic brain injury (TBI) have features in common with ADHD, and MPH has been reported to be an effective treatment in adults with TBI. There is little literature documenting the efficacy of MPH in children with TBI. Read More

View Article
August 1998