Centrifugo-pneumatic valving utilizing dissolvable films.

Authors:
Robert Gorkin
Robert Gorkin
Dublin City University
Ireland
Charles E Nwankire
Charles E Nwankire
Dublin City University
Ireland
Xin Zhang
Xin Zhang
School of Marine Sciences
New Bedford | United States
Gerard G Donohoe
Gerard G Donohoe
Dublin City University
Ireland
Martha Rook
Martha Rook
Nuvelo Incorporated
Dr. Jens Ducree, Dr. rer. nat. habil. Dipl. Phys.
Dr. Jens Ducree, Dr. rer. nat. habil. Dipl. Phys.
Fraunhofer Project Centre at Dublin City University
Professor (Full)
microfluidics, Lab-on-a-Chip, hydrodynanmics, business development, project management, organisational leadership
Glasnevin, Dublin 9 | Ireland

Lab Chip 2012 Aug 13;12(16):2894-902. Epub 2012 Jun 13.

Biomedical Diagnostics Institute, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland.

In this article we introduce a novel technology that utilizes specialized water dissolvable thin films for valving in centrifugal microfluidic systems. In previous work (William Meathrel and Cathy Moritz, IVD Technologies, 2007), dissolvable films (DFs) have been assembled in laminar flow devices to form efficient sacrificial valves where DFs simply open by direct contact with liquid. Here, we build on the original DF valving scheme to leverage sophisticated, merely rotationally actuated vapour barriers and flow control for enabling comprehensive assay integration with low-complexity instrumentation on "lab-on-a-disc" platforms. The advanced sacrificial valving function is achieved by creating an inverted gas-liquid stack upstream of the DF during priming of the system. At low rotational speeds, a pocket of trapped air prevents a surface-tension stabilized liquid plug from wetting the DF membrane. However, high-speed rotation disrupts the metastable gas/liquid interface to wet the DF and thus opens the valve. By judicious choice of the radial position and geometry of the valve, the burst frequency can be tuned over a wide range of rotational speeds nearly 10 times greater than those attained by common capillary burst valves based on hydrophobic constrictions. The broad range of reproducible burst frequencies of the DF valves bears the potential for full integration and automation of comprehensive, multi-step biochemical assay protocols. In this report we demonstrate DF valving, discuss the biocompatibility of using the films, and show a potential sequential valving system including the on-demand release of on-board stored liquid reagents, fast centrifugal sedimentation and vigorous mixing; thus providing a viable basis for use in lab-on-a-disc platforms for point-of-care diagnostics and other life science applications.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c2lc20973jDOI Listing
August 2012
33 Reads
10 Citations

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

rotational speeds
8
dissolvable films
8
valving
5
wet opens
4
membrane high-speed
4
opens valve
4
valve judicious
4
judicious choice
4
interface wet
4
gas/liquid interface
4
rotation disrupts
4
disrupts metastable
4
metastable gas/liquid
4
choice radial
4
high-speed rotation
4
radial position
4
speeds times
4
range rotational
4
times greater
4
greater attained
4

Altmetric Statistics

References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Article in IVD Technol.
Meathrel et al.
IVD Technol. 2007
Article in Lab Chip
Gorkin et al.
Lab Chip 2010
Article in Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng.
Madou et al.
Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng. 2006
Article in J. Micromech. Microeng.
Ducrée et al.
J. Micromech. Microeng. 2007
Article in Lab Chip
Haeberle et al.
Lab Chip 2006
Article in Biomed. Microdevices
Steigert et al.
Biomed. Microdevices 2007
Article in Colloids Surf., B
Kido et al.
Colloids Surf., B 2007
Article in Lab Chip
Lee et al.
Lab Chip 2009
Article in Anal. Chem.
Andersson et al.
Anal. Chem. 2007
Article in Rev. Sci. Instrum.
Nolte et al.
Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2009
Article in Lab Chip
Park et al.
Lab Chip 2007

Similar Publications