Gender stereotypes and superior conformity of the self in a sample of cyclists.

Authors:
Aymery Constant, PhD, MPsych
Aymery Constant, PhD, MPsych
EHESP School of Public Health
lecturer
Health psychology and behaviours
Rennes | France

Accid Anal Prev 2013 Jan 4;50:336-40. Epub 2012 Jun 4.

Laboratoire Psychologie, Santé & Qualité de Vie, Université de Bordeaux, F-33076, France.

In the field of driving, people tend to think they are more competent and more cautious than others. This is the superior conformity of the self (SCS). Our main hypothesis was that, among cyclists, women would show a higher SCS on cautiousness, though men would show a higher SCS concerning competence. 1799 cyclists provided a self-assessment of their own cautiousness and of other people's cautiousness. The same procedure was used for competence. Consistent with the hypothesis, the SCS was gender-specific: it was more prominent for women concerning cautiousness and more prominent for men concerning competence. These results could explain why people tend to ignore the safety campaigns. They also indicate the importance of adapting messages concerning safety measures to gender.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2012.05.006DOI Listing
January 2013
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