miR than meets the eye.

Genes Dev 2011 Aug;25(16):1663-7

Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

Retinoblastoma is a rare pediatric cancer that has served as a paradigm to investigate the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. In this issue of Genes & Development, Conkrite and colleagues (pp. 1734-1745) found high levels of the miR-17~92 and miR-106b-25 microRNAs in primary retinoblastomas and show that overexpression of miR-17~92 accelerates retinoblastoma development in mice by promoting proliferation, in part by reducing expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. These experiments identify the RB/miR-17~92/p21 axis as a critical regulator of retinoblastoma tumorigenesis and potentially many other cancers.

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Source
http://genesdev.cshlp.org/cgi/doi/10.1101/gad.17454011
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gad.17454011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3165930PMC
August 2011
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