The 2010 Amazon drought.

Authors:
Simon L Lewis
Simon L Lewis
University of Leeds
United Kingdom
Paulo M Brando
Paulo M Brando
University of Leeds
United Kingdom
Oliver L Phillips
Oliver L Phillips
University of Leeds
United Kingdom
Daniel Nepstad
Daniel Nepstad
Woods Hole Research Center
Falmouth | United States

Science 2011 Feb;331(6017):554

School of Geography, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.

In 2010, dry-season rainfall was low across Amazonia, with apparent similarities to the major 2005 drought. We analyzed a decade of satellite-derived rainfall data to compare both events. Standardized anomalies of dry-season rainfall showed that 57% of Amazonia had low rainfall in 2010 as compared with 37% in 2005 (≤-1 standard deviation from long-term mean). By using relationships between drying and forest biomass responses measured for 2005, we predict the impact of the 2010 drought as 2.2 × 10(15) grams of carbon [95% confidence intervals (CIs) are 1.2 and 3.4], largely longer-term committed emissions from drought-induced tree deaths, compared with 1.6 × 10(15) grams of carbon (CIs 0.8 and 2.6) for the 2005 event.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1200807DOI Listing
February 2011
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