Archimedes. Question 3. Should carbamazepine be administered to manage agitation and aggressive behaviour following paediatric acquired brain injury?

Authors:
Emma Waters
Emma Waters
c Clinical Psychology
Deborah Murdoch-Eaton
Deborah Murdoch-Eaton
University of Leeds
United Kingdom

Arch Dis Child 2010 Nov;95(11):950-2

Paediatric Neuropsychology, The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/adc.2010.200329DOI Listing
November 2010
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