Monoterpenoid extract of sage (Salvia lavandulaefolia) with cholinesterase inhibiting properties improves cognitive performance and mood in healthy adults.

Authors:
David O Kennedy
David O Kennedy
Northumbria University
United Kingdom
Fiona L Dodd
Fiona L Dodd
Northumbria University
Bernadette C Robertson
Bernadette C Robertson
Northumbria University
United Kingdom
Edward J Okello
Edward J Okello
Newcastle University
United Kingdom
Jonathon L Reay
Jonathon L Reay
Northumbria University
United Kingdom
Andrew B Scholey
Andrew B Scholey
Northumbria University
United Kingdom
Crystal F Haskell
Crystal F Haskell
Northumbria University
United Kingdom

J Psychopharmacol 2011 Aug 11;25(8):1088-100. Epub 2010 Oct 11.

Brain, Performance and Nutrition Research Centre, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Extracts of sage (Salvia officinalis/lavandulaefolia) with terpenoid constituents have previously been shown to inhibit cholinesterase and improve cognitive function. The current study combined an in vitro investigation of the cholinesterase inhibitory properties and phytochemical constituents of a S. lavandulaefolia essential oil, with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study assessing the effects of a single dose on cognitive performance and mood. In this latter investigation 36 healthy participants received capsules containing either 50 µL of the essential oil or placebo on separate occasions, 7 days apart. Cognitive function was assessed using a selection of computerized memory and attention tasks and the Cognitive Demand Battery before the treatment and 1-h and 4-h post-dose. The essential oil was a potent inhibitor of human acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and consisted almost exclusively of monoterpenoids. Oral consumption lead to improved performance of secondary memory and attention tasks, most notably at the 1-h post-dose testing session, and reduced mental fatigue and increased alertness which were more pronounced 4-h post-dose. These results extend previous observations of improved cognitive performance and mood following AChE inhibitory sage extracts and suggest that the ability of well-tolerated terpenoid-containing extracts to beneficially modulate cholinergic function and cognitive performance deserves further attention.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0269881110385594DOI Listing
August 2011
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