Tobacco and the skin.

Authors:
Andrei I Metelitsa
Andrei I Metelitsa
University of Alberta
Edmonton | Canada
Gilles J Lauzon
Gilles J Lauzon
University of Alberta
Canada

Clin Dermatol 2010 Jul-Aug;28(4):384-90

Division of Dermatology and Cutaneous Sciences, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G3.

Smoking negatively impacts the health of the skin as it does every organ system. This contribution reviews the effect of cigarette smoking on wound healing, wrinkling, and aging of the skin, skin cancer, psoriasis, and other inflammatory skin diseases, hidradenitis suppurativa, acne, alopecia, lupus erythematosus, polymorphous light eruption, and tobacco-associated oral lesions. Dermatologists need to encourage their patients to discontinue this deleterious habit.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2010.03.021DOI Listing
October 2010
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