Changing attitudes toward influenza vaccination in U.S. Kidney transplant programs over the past decade.

Authors:
Pradeep V Kadambi
Pradeep V Kadambi
University of Arizona
United States
Robert C Harland
Robert C Harland
University of Arizona
Tucson | United States
Suneel Udani
Suneel Udani
University of Chicago
United States
Rajiv Poduval
Rajiv Poduval
University of Chicago
Chicago | United States
Michelle A Josephson
Michelle A Josephson
University of Chicago
Chicago | United States

Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2010 Sep 1;5(9):1637-41. Epub 2010 Jul 1.

Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

Background And Objectives: Influenza infection in transplant recipients is often associated with significant morbidity. Surveys were conducted in 1999 and 2009 to find out if the influenza vaccination practices in the U.S. transplant programs had changed over the past 10 years.

Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements: In 1999, a survey of the 217 United Network for Organ Sharing-certified kidney and kidney-pancreas transplant centers in the U.S. was conducted regarding their influenza vaccination practice patterns. A decade later, a second similar survey of 239 transplant programs was carried out.

Results: The 2009 respondents, compared with 1999, were more likely to recommend vaccination for kidney (94.5% versus 84.4%, P = 0.02) and kidney-pancreas recipients (76.8% versus 48.5%, P < 0.001), family members of transplant recipients (52.5% versus 21.0%, P < 0.001), and medical staff caring for transplant patients (79.6% versus 40.7%, P < 0.001). Physicians and other members of the transplant team were more likely to have been vaccinated in 2009 compared with 1999 (84.2% versus 62.3% of physicians, P < 0.001 and 91.2% versus 50.3% of nonphysicians, P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Our study suggests a greater adoption of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention influenza vaccination guidelines by U.S. transplant programs in vaccinating solid-organ transplant recipients, close family contacts, and healthcare workers.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2215/CJN.00150110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2974405PMC

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September 2010
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