Total antioxidant capacity intake and colorectal cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study.

Authors:
Rania A Mekary
Rania A Mekary
MCPHS University
Boston | United States
Kana Wu
Kana Wu
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston | United States
Edward Giovannucci
Edward Giovannucci
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston | United States
Laura Sampson
Laura Sampson
Boston University School of Public Health
United States
Charles Fuchs
Charles Fuchs
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School
Boston | United States
Donna Spiegelman
Donna Spiegelman
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston | United States
Walter C Willett
Walter C Willett
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston | United States

Cancer Causes Control 2010 Aug;21(8):1315-21

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Bldg 2, Rm 355A, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Objective: To examine the association between total antioxidant capacity (TAC) intake and colorectal cancer incidence.

Methods: TAC intake was assessed in 1986 and every 4 years thereafter in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a prospective cohort study of 47,339 men. Between 1986 and 2004, 952 colorectal cancer cases were diagnosed. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results: Comparing the highest versus lowest quintile, TAC intake from foods only (dietary TAC) was not associated with colorectal (multivariate-RR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.78, 1.23) or colon (multivariate-RR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.61) cancer risk, but was inversely associated with rectal cancer risk (multivariate-RR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.96). For the same comparison, TAC intake from foods and supplements (total TAC) was not associated with colorectal (multivariate-RR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.73, 1.14), colon (multivariate-RR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.33), or rectal (multivariate-RR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.52, 1.38) cancer risk.

Conclusions: Dietary and total TAC intakes were not associated with colorectal and colon cancer risk. Dietary, but not total, TAC intake was inversely associated with rectal cancer risk, suggesting antioxidants per se may not be associated with rectal cancer risk.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9559-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3117427PMC

Still can't find the full text of the article?

We can help you send a request to the authors directly.
August 2010
32 Reads
6 Citations
2.735 Impact Factor

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

cancer risk
24
tac intake
20
total tac
12
colorectal cancer
12
rectal cancer
12
associated rectal
12
associated colorectal
12
cancer
9
professionals follow-up
8
follow-up study
8
dietary total
8
inversely associated
8
tac
8
intake foods
8
tac associated
8
colon multivariate-rr
8
health professionals
8
intake colorectal
8
antioxidant capacity
8
colorectal multivariate-rr
8

References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Article in Am J Clin Nutr
JH Weisburger et al.
Am J Clin Nutr 1991

International Agency for Research on Cancer et al.
2005

World Cancer Research Fund et al.
2007
Article in Eur J Clin Nutr
M Serafini et al.
Eur J Clin Nutr 1996
Article in Mutat Res
OI Aruoma et al.
Mutat Res 2003
Article in J Nutr
N Pellegrini et al.
J Nutr 2003
Article in Anal Biochem
IF Benzie et al.
Anal Biochem 1996
Article in J Nutr
BL Halvorsen et al.
J Nutr 2002
Article in Am J Epidemiol
EB Rimm et al.
Am J Epidemiol 1992
Article in J Am Diet Assoc
D Feskanich et al.
J Am Diet Assoc 1993
Article in Curr Opin Lipidol
R Blomhoff et al.
Curr Opin Lipidol 2005

Similar Publications