Acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis with advanced gastric cancer: a case report.

Authors:
Fuminori Goda
Fuminori Goda
Kagawa University
Japan
Hiroyuki Okuyama
Hiroyuki Okuyama
Kagawa University
Japan
Ayumu Yamagami
Ayumu Yamagami
Kagawa University
Japan
Hiromi Nakata
Hiromi Nakata
Hiroshima University
Japan
Michio Inukai
Michio Inukai
National Okayama Medical Center
Eiji Ohashi
Eiji Ohashi
Kyoto University
Japan
Takashi Himoto
Takashi Himoto
Kagawa University School of Medicine
Japan

Cases J 2010 Mar 9;3:76. Epub 2010 Mar 9.

Cancer Center, Kagawa Medical University Hospital, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki-cho, Kita-gun, Kagawa, 761-0793, Japan.

Although the advanced stages of neoplasms have a risk of superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT), an initial clinical diagnosis of MVT is sometimes difficult and it can be treated as a cancer-related pain using NSAIDs and/or opioids.We herein present a case of palliative stage of cancer with acute MVT, which was successfully treated with immediate anticoagulant therapy. We believe this case provides an important clinical lesson, which is that we should remember that MVT is one of the potential causes of abdominal pain with cancer patients and the thrombosis can be easily identified by US and CT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1757-1626-3-76DOI ListingPossible
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2844363PMCFound
March 2010
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